Whitney Wolfe and Bumble help out the #metoo movement

Whitney Wolfe Herd Single-Handedly Helps Out the #metoo Movement

Dating Apps

The #metoo movement has finally reached Tinder. The app has been updated to include a pathway for female users to take control and make the first move in dating relationships much like Bumble, the dating app created by Whitney Wolfe . The new feature is going to give women the ability to opt to be the only ones who can initiate conversations when romantic matches are made. The company has done this in response to the complaints that have been surfacing during the “#metoo” era.

Tinder CEO Mandy Ginsberg has stated that women do not necessarily want to be the ones who are making the first move, but if they would feel more comfortable doing so, it sounds great to her. She and her company are making a point of listening to their female customers, and they want to be sure to address their needs as they come up.

As it is right now, if both parties swipe right, either one can begin a conversation. With the update, when a match is made, the male will not be able to contact the female first. It will be the female who will decide whether a conversation is going to start or not. The feature is similar to the way that Bumble works, but there is one major difference. Users of the Tinder app can turn the new feature off.

How Whitney Wolfe Herd Put Women First

Whitney Wolfe Herd is a co-founder of Tinder, but after she left the company, she started her own dating app and called it “Bumble.” There is no option with this app. Men are not allowed to make the first move. If a match is made and the female does not send the male a message within 24 hours, the match expires.

Although Tinder’s new feature looks a lot like the Bumble app, Ms. Ginsberg states that Tinder’s update was not created to compete with Bumble. She says that the new feature came into being because of the several years of discussions that the executives have been having about this very subject. They have been listening closely to their female customers, and they were working to give them what they said that they needed. The fact that Tinder has added the update demonstrates that the company is aware of what is going on between men and women in the dating scene right now and that things need to change.

Whitney Wolfe Herd is in favor of anything that takes women’s needs into consideration. “We applaud any company making business decisions that empower women.”

We at @bumble believe that 💛=‘s ⬆️

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How Bumble Came to “Bee”

Whitney Wolfe Herd didn’t exactly plan to start a dating app; it sort of fell into her lap after a period of disheartening circumstances. She was 23 years old and living with her mother when she took a trip to California to visit a friend from college. When the hot water went out, they were forced to use the shower at a nearby friend’s house. The friend was Justin Mateen.

Whitney Wolfe Herd had dinner with Mr. Mateen that night, and at that dinner, she also became acquainted with Sean Rad. The three of them put their heads together and started Tinder, but things began to become unbearable for Whitney Wolfe Herd. She was forced to file a lawsuit against Tinder and parent company IAC for sexual harassment, and she received a settlement of an undisclosed amount of money in response to that.

Whitney Wolfe Herd is now the founder and CEO of Bumble. She was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, and got an early start as an entrepreneur. While she was a student at Southern Methodist University, Whitney Wolfe Herd started to sell bamboo tote bags to help the victims of the BP oil spill. These bags gained popularity when Nicole Richie and Rachel Zoe were photographed with them. Whitney Wolfe Herd was only 19 years old at the time.

After Whitney Wolfe Herd’s graduation, she traveled all the way to South East Asia to work at some of the orphanages in this area. Then, she partnered with Patrick Aufdenkamp to form the non-profit organization the “Help Us Project.”

After this time, Whitney Wolfe Herd joined Sean Rad, Chris Gulczynski and Justin Mateen to co-found Tinder with them. She became the company’s vice-president of marketing. Whitney Wolfe Herd is largely responsible for the app’s popularity because she was the one who personally introduced it to women at the sororities and men at the fraternities of nearby colleges.

See Also:  If People Don’t Believe In Your Startup Business, Keep Going

The Buzz Around Bumble

Whitney Wolfe Herd’s tenure at Tinder ended under strained circumstances, and she left the company in 2014. This gave her the opportunity to start her own venture with partner Andrew Andreev, and she called it “Bumble.” Whitney Wolfe Herd packed her bags and moved to Austin, Texas, in 2014 where Bumble is currently headquartered.

In 2016, Bumble became one of the most popular dating app in the country, and it now has 22 million registered users.

Keep Reading: With Bumble Bizz, Whitney Wolfe Herd Wants Networking to Be as Easy as Swiping Right

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